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The Genetics Podcast: The Origins and Future of the UK Biobank

In the most recent episode of The Genetics Podcast, CEO of Sano Genetics, Patrick Short interviews Professor Sir Rory Collins, the Principal Investigator and Chief Executive of the UK Biobank. In this episode, Collins discusses the beginnings of the UK Biobank, its current success and how he hopes it will develop in the future.

The UK Biobank, established in 2007, was a project primarily funded by the Medical Research Council and Wellcome Trust in order to track the health of a large cohort of individuals in the UK. Between 2006 and 2019, the project recruited 500,000 individuals across the country aged between 40 and 69 years and obtained various samples and information from them regarding their health. Since its initial release, the UK Biobank – which contains genetic, physical and clinical data from a large cohort of individuals – has provided a vital resource for researchers across the world to investigate why some people develop diseases and others do not. The UK Biobank continues to be strengthened by the integration of other important information, such as whole-genome and imaging data.

During this podcast, Collins emphasises the power of this open resource and how it was built for the imaginations of many. He discusses how the UK Biobank have tried to help during the coronavirus pandemic and also discusses what other important data they hope to integrate into the resource over the next ten years.

Catch the full episode here now!

Exploring all things genetics, Cambridge University Alumnus and current CEO of Sano Genetics, Dr Patrick Short analyses the science, interviews the experts and helps share the stories of people who have been personally affected by genetic conditions in The Genetics Podcast. To take part in the latest research studies mentioned in this podcast please visit www.sanogenetics.com/research

You can subscribe to The Genetics Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify. You can also follow Sano Genetics on Twitter.

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