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Gene regulation therapy could protect against Alzheimer’s

Researchers have developed and tested a novel gene regulation therapy, that leverages zinc finger proteins, to treat brain disorders such […]

Spinal fluid detects Alzheimer’s inflammation

Recent findings suggest that people who carry the gene variant associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease also […]

Genetics Unzipped podcast: 100 not out – Genes and ageing

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped, the podcast from the Genetics Society, presenter Kat Arney takes a look at […]

Novel mechanisms that cause tau protein clumping in brain diseases

A team of researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has taken a major step towards understanding […]

Largest ever GWAS of Alzheimer’s disease

The results from the largest GWAS of Alzheimer’s disease have been released as preprint in medRxiv. These findings have implicated […]

The Genetics Of Alzheimer’s: Uncovering new Mechanisms and Drug Targets

An understanding of the environmental and genetic risk of Alzheimer’s Disease is vital for the production of more effective therapies. […]

scREAD: single-cell RNA-Seq database for Alzheimer’s Disease

Researchers at The Ohio State University have developed an integrated database known as scREAD – single-cell RNA-Seq database for Alzheimer’s […]

Genetic risk for Alzheimer’s progression differs with sex

It is well documented that the genetic risk for Alzheimer’s has a sex bias. Sex bias in Alzheimer’s Carrying a […]

MicroRNAs: The cast-off genetic material with the potential to fight diseases

This is a summary of an article written by Alice Godden originally published on TheConversation. Of the nearly 3 billion […]

Shareable Science: What the “wellderly” can teach us about the genetics of healthy aging

Aging affects everyone, right down to our genetic core, but there’s plenty of evidence showing that each individual experiences the effects of age differently. As it turns out, some people are predisposed to a less disruptive (a kinder, gentler) aging process. New research hopes to uncover why that is.