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Genetics Unzipped podcast: Out of Africa – uncovering history and diversity in the human genome

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped presenter Kat Arney takes a virtual trip to Africa to explore the genetic […]

Genomics against COVID-19: A summary

Last week, we asked the genomics community how they were shifting their focus to help fight the novel coronavirus. We […]

Genetics Unzipped podcast: Twisted history – the true story of the double helix

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped we’re unwinding history to uncover some of the less well-known stories behind the […]

Video Alice Zhang: The genesis of a start-up

About a year ago, Alice Zhang, founder of Verge Genomics did a talk at Stanford on how she left her […]

Genetics Unzipped Podcast: Involving Patients in Genomics Research

“Nothing about me without me!” is the rallying cry for patient involvement in research. In the latest episode of Genetics […]

Genetics Unzipped Podcast: Accidental Invention of Genetic Fingerprinting

Alec Jeffreys, a geneticist working at the University of Leicester, never intended to invent genetic fingerprinting. But at 9.05am on the morning of 10th September 1984, that’s exactly what he did.

Opinion: We should increase education of genomics in our curriculum

Genomics is a hugely powerful tool and the general population should know about it!

Ethical Piece: Eugenics and Where to Draw The Line

It all comes down to what decision is being made based upon a person’s genetics.

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Genetics Unzipped podcast: Stinky breath, superheroes and the ‘perfect genome’ – tackling myths and misconceptions about genomics

In the latest episode of Genetics Unzipped, the Genetics Society podcast, Kat Arney takes a look at some of the common myths and misconceptions surrounding genomics and genetic tests. Are mutations always bad? If you’re more like your mum, does that mean you’ve inherited more of her genes? And is there such a thing as a perfect genome?