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Women in genetics

Can you name a female scientist? For many people reading this, this may seem like a very easy question to […]

Insight into the distinct tumour immune microenvironments in gastric cancer patients

Researchers have compared the tumour immune microenvironments (TIMEs) of primary gastric cancers and found distinct patterns between primary and metastatic […]

Human Genome Project: Triumph or failure?

It has been 20 years since the first draft of the human genome was unveiled. The ambitious project to sequence […]

An impact study on the rare disease community: a call to action

Jo Balfour, one of the founding members and current Operations Manager at Cambridge Rare Disease Network (CRDN), has collaborated with […]

Researchers have characterised and analysed the unique architecture of the largest and most complex CRISPR-Cas system known to date

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen (UCPH) have characterised and analysed the unique architecture of one of the most complex […]

Biologically-validated AI is how scientists are realising the full potential of single-cell RNA sequencing

The promise of single-cell gene expression data Genomic data are an excellent source of novel disease biomarkers and targets. In […]

Biohacking by mail order: Reckless or educational?

  This article has been written by our guest contributor, Alice Godden. Image credit: Freepik.com In this short feature, I […]

Foundations for AI are “Critical” to our Continued Success – Interview with Dr Paul Agapow, AstraZeneca

FLG: Can you introduce yourself and your work? I am currently a Health Informatics Director at AstraZeneca. I started my […]

Interview with Arianne Shahvisi, Senior Lecturer in Ethics, Brighton and Sussex Medical School

Arianne Shahvisi is a Senior Lecturer in Ethics at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. We managed to have a chat with Arianne ahead of her speaking at the Festival of Genomics, to get her take on the ‘coloniality’ of health and how the much-hyped advent of Whole Genome Sequencing might play a role in exasperating social injustices.